Already have a Metaverse CEO? – Datanews on PC

FOMO is a terrible syndrome. This fear of missing out or ‘fear of missing something’ is a common fear among investors who, for lack of anything better, aim to jump on the bandwagon. Because if everyone gets on the train, I must be too, they reason. FOMO overcomes the twinkling dollars of the starry sky by masking the fainter stars. FOMO lures you to unnaturally attend a fashionable party: unthinkable to miss the party of your life.

FOMO is a mechanism widely used by tech giants to attract consumers and businesses. First, the technology is revealed. Then (sometimes unrealistic) expectations are raised, with the help of research, reports and other (internal) statistics. Based on these expectations, a first community is created which imagines new developments and future perspectives. Slowly but surely, word of mouth is taking its toll – aided in part or not by heavy marketing machinery – and growing. Analysts sell research reports, while traders provide their opinions. Then the editors of specialized journals publish their files.

Already have a Metaverse CEO?

Then comes the time when the topic makes headlines in the mainstream media. And everything accelerates suddenly. Investors are opening their wallets and starting to inject funds into projects and companies around these new technologies. Entrepreneurs become aware of the importance of these investments and adapt their strategy to integrate these new developments in their commercial project and their product catalog. Because there is definitely no question of missing this train. A perversely effective strategy that has proven itself for decades, that continues to pay off, and that many have blindly engaged in. What about the consumer or the client of the company? He witnesses the progress of this new technology first hand, hears about the launch of international projects and the first pilot projects at competitors and, bingo, FOMO does the rest.

Take the metaverse. Metaverses promise us to be more connected than ever to each other in virtual worlds. That we will be able to buy virtual objects, attend 3D concerts and attend virtual meetings in the office. And if we take the definition in the broad sense: that this is the successor to the World Wide Web as we use it today and as we have known it since it constituted the World Wide Web. Formal engagements and so, ladies and gentlemen, FOMO at its best. In this issue, we try to answer the question of whether you, as a CIO, business leader or IT manager, should consider this topic. “Impossible to avoid! The metaverse is part of an ‘inevitable future,'” believes Pieter Van Leugenhagen, author of a book on the metaverse. For their part, Gartner analysts only give a maximum of 4 years before a quarter of the world’s population spends at least 1 hour a day in the metaverse. For the firm, it is clear that the metaverse will inevitably lead to new digital business models. FOMO again and again, ladies and gentlemen!

FOMO is a perversely effective strategy.

FOMO is also fueled by doubt and uncertainty. Dissatisfaction with one’s own overly rigid organizational processes. Frustration with the lack of functionality of existing business solutions. Worrying about the risk of being unprepared to face tomorrow’s competition. This is where FOMO can play a positive role: not letting yourself get blindsided and signing up can allow you to open up to an often essential innovation. With a Chief Innovation Officer at the helm? Unless you want to call him the FOMO Chief. But why not appoint a very fashionable Metaverse CEO in the wake of big American brands without delay?

FOMO is a terrible syndrome. This fear of missing out or ‘fear of missing something’ is a common fear among investors who, for lack of anything better, aim to jump on the bandwagon. Because if everyone gets on the train, I must be too, they reason. FOMO overcomes the twinkling dollars of the starry sky by masking the fainter stars. FOMO lures you to unnaturally attend a fashionable party: unthinkable to miss the party of your life. FOMO is a mechanism widely used by tech giants to attract consumers and businesses. First, the technology is revealed. Then (sometimes unrealistic) expectations are raised, with the help of research, reports and other (internal) statistics. Based on these expectations, a first community is created which imagines new developments and future perspectives. Slowly but surely, word of mouth is taking its toll – aided in part or not by heavy marketing machinery – and growing. Analysts sell research reports, while traders provide their opinions. Then the editors of specialized journals publish their files. Then comes the time when the topic makes headlines in the mainstream media. And everything accelerates suddenly. Investors are opening their wallets and starting to inject funds into projects and companies around these new technologies. Entrepreneurs become aware of the importance of these investments and adapt their strategy to integrate these new developments in their commercial project and their product catalog. Because there is definitely no question of missing this train. A perversely effective strategy that has proven itself for decades, that continues to pay off, and that many have blindly engaged in. What about the consumer or the client of the company? He witnesses the progress of this new technology first hand, hears about the launch of international projects and the first pilot projects at competitors and, bingo, FOMO does the rest. Take the metaverse. Metaverses promise us to be more connected than ever to each other in virtual worlds. That we will be able to buy virtual objects, attend 3D concerts and attend virtual meetings in the office. And if we take the definition in the broad sense: that this is the successor to the World Wide Web as we use it today and as we have known it since it constituted the World Wide Web. Formal engagements and so, ladies and gentlemen, FOMO at its best. In this issue, we try to answer the question of whether you, as a CIO, business leader or IT manager, should consider this topic. “Impossible to avoid! The metaverse is part of an ‘inevitable future,'” believes Pieter Van Leugenhagen, author of a book on the metaverse. For their part, Gartner analysts only give a maximum of 4 years before a quarter of the world’s population spends at least 1 hour a day in the metaverse. For the firm, it is clear that the metaverse will inevitably lead to new digital business models. FOMO again and again, ladies and gentlemen! FOMO is also fueled by doubt and uncertainty. Dissatisfaction with one’s own overly rigid organizational processes. Frustration with the lack of functionality of existing business solutions. Worrying about the risk of being unprepared to face tomorrow’s competition. This is where FOMO can play a positive role: not letting yourself get blindsided and signing up can allow you to open up to an often essential innovation. With a Chief Innovation Officer at the helm? Unless you want to call him the FOMO Chief. But why not appoint a very fashionable Metaverse CEO in the wake of big American brands without delay?

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